What to eat and drink in Amsterdam?

Best Street Food in Amsterdam, What to Eat in Amsterdam? Here is our post below, which will answer your questions about the 18 Best Street Foods. What to eat and drink in Amsterdam? You can find the best snacks and street food while visiting the streets in our article below. Amsterdam’s streets, avenues, canals, parks and markets appeal to your eyes, your heart and your stomach. In this article, we will appeal to your stomach.

Bitterballen

In the sense of chilly balls, they are fried, crispy balls of meatballs. It is the best of the delicious, deep-fried Dutch pub snacks traditionally served with mustard, and can be found on the menu of most Amsterdam drinking venues.

Stroopwafel

Image by: CC BY 2.0 barbara w via Flickr

These waffles, which have recently started to spread to other countries, will fully recover your sugar and energy with a hot coffee and will be engraved in your memory with the cafe. While two thin waffles glued together with a layer of sweet syrup go best with a hot version from a street market or oven, I recommend eating them with a hot drink in the cafe as they melt even more in your glass.

Thick Dutch Fries

Fries in Amsterdam David Berkowitz

Image by: CC BY 2.0 David Berkowitz via Flickr

Before I went to Amsterdam, I never thought that French fries would come to mind when I turn back from there. These Potatoes, called Patat or Frites, are definitely not the standard french fries you have in mind as a snack. The taste and legendary sauces are great, even served with a hot cone serving paper is amazing! You can ask for ‘patatje oorlog’ for a dollop of peanut sauce, mayonnaise and onion or ‘special patat’ for a curry mix of ketchup, mayonnaise and onion.

Dutch Pancakes

It gives energy, rests, and gives strength to your feet in a short break while walking. Dutch pancakes have a thin, pancake-like consistency loaded with fruit, cream, and syrup, and have more surface area for flavorful toppings.

Jenever

It is not a dish, but plays an important role in Dutch gastronomy, it is jenever, the forerunner of gin. Distilled from juniper berries, this alcohol has a whiskey-like malty flavor and was traditionally used for medicinal purposes before becoming one of the country’s most important beverages. Served in a tulip-shaped glass and often served alongside a beer, the combination is known as kopstootje, meaning “head butt.” I hope you can continue without falling apart!

Apple pie

Apple pie by John Paul Robinson

In Amsterdam, it’s a must to transform the delicious taste of cinnamon on your weary walks into energy with crunchy apple pie! The Dutch version of the deep dish is a cinnamon-infused, raisin-infused and whipped cream-infused apple pie not to be missed!

Raw herring

Herring Amsterdam CC BY 2.0 Bryce Edwards via Flickr

Image by: CC BY 2.0 Bryce Edwards via Flickr

Raw herring is an Amsterdam flavor legend! Every visitor to Amsterdam should try it. You’ll see haringhandels (herring carts) serving up this Dutch specialty all over the city – ask for a “brood sauce” to have the fish served in a small sandwich with pickles and onions. The best time to try raw herring is between May and July, when herring is said to be the sweetest.

Kibbeling

Kibbeling CC BY 2.0 Dirk Vorderstrasse via Flickr

Image by: CC BY 2.0 Dirk Vorderstrasse via Flickr

If you’re not feeling brave enough to try raw herring, then you can still get your fish taste from kibbeling, the battered and deep-fried bites of white fish; Every drop is as delicious as they look and is often served with a mayonnaise vegetable sauce and lemon. For the best kibbeling experience, I recommend trying it hot and fresh from a street market or food truck

Croquettes from a vending machine (Sandviç ATMs)

FEBO CC BY 2.0 Lars Plougmann via Flickr

Image by: CC BY 2.0 Lars Plougmann via Flickr

It reminds me of a time when I came across this method without knowing it and was very happy with my snack. I’m not going to talk about the guarantee of taste or the Original taste of food, but these hole-in-the-wall cafes make it onto the Dutch must-have list on their novelty value alone. Head to any FEBO and you’ll see a range of hot snacks like hamburgers, croquettes and frikandellen displayed behind glass doors. Put some coins in the slot and voila; your light evening snack!

Oliebollen

Oliebollen CC BY 2.0 Franklin Heijnen via Flickr

Image by: CC BY 2.0 Franklin Heijnen via Flickr

The name literally means “balls of fat”. Essentially, they’re deep-fried sweet dumplings (sometimes containing bits of fruit) and sprinkled with powdered sugar, and are so delicious that they pop up on New Year’s Eve just before the January diet kicks off.

Cheese!

Amsterdam cheese shop store, Marie-Charlotte Pezé

Image by: Marie-Charlotte Pezé

Cheese is big business in the Netherlands, so don’t go home without visiting Amsterdam’s many “kaas” shops or markets and tasting some Gouda, Geitenkaas or Maasdammer. For an introduction to the most popular Dutch cheeses, drop by one of the Henri Willig Cheese and More stores. Afterwards, visit the Reypenaer Tasting Room to sample their award-winning cheese with a professional guide. In Negen Straatjes (9th Street) Kaaskamer’s shelves are filled with cheeses from the Netherlands and abroad.

Poffertjes

Poffertjes Amsterdam Mira Pangkey

Image by: CC BY 2.0 Mira Pangkey via Flickr

“PO-fer-jus”) is served in restaurants and pancake houses all over Amsterdam, but nothing more than a street market.

Ontbijtkoek

Ontbijtkoek Amsterdam CC BY-SA 3.0 Takeaway via Wikimedia Commons

Image by: CC BY-SA 3.0 Takeaway via Wikimedia Commons

Untveytkuk – This delicious gingerbread cake comes in a loaf and is dense and filling enough that one slice is always enough. The name literally means “breakfast cake”; But it gives you whatever you’re looking for at any time of the day! Spread some thick butter on it for extra flavor.

Stamppot

Stamppot CC BY-SA 2.0 Ministerie van Buitenlandse Zaken via Flickr

Image by: CC BY-SA 2.0 Ministerie van Buitenlandse Zaken via Flickr

I remember Amsterdam as cool and cold as the weather. This dish is great after cool Amsterdam rides. Literally translated as “mash bowl,” this traditional dish includes mashed potatoes with other vegetables – the traditional stamp includes various combinations of sauerkraut, carrots, onions or cabbage and is often served with a large juicy sausage.

Dutch liquorice

licorice amsterdam

image by Iamsterdam.com

Eating licorice is a national pastime in the Netherlands – in fact, the country has the highest per capita consumption of sweets in the entire world. But be careful! If you’re looking for a sweet taste and popping salty Liquorice in your mouth, you might be fighting with your stomach.

Snert

Erwtensoep Amsterdam CC BY-SA 3.0 Takeaway via Wikimedia Commons

Image by: CC BY-SA 3.0 Takeaway via Wikimedia Commons

Widely consumed all over the Netherlands, snert makes a hearty winter snack traditionally served by street vendors to ice skaters on frozen canals. snort. (Let me be warned it includes pork) The Dutch version of pea soup is a thick green stew of peas, pork, celery, onions, and leeks.

Indonesian Rijsttafel

Rijstafel at Desa

Image by: Dishtales BV

The strong Indonesian influence on Amsterdam’s food scene can be felt (and smelled, mmm) throughout the city, and no food tour of the Netherlands is truly complete without a visit to an Indonesian restaurant. For the true Indish-Dutch experience, order a rijsttafel (rice table); A mix of small dishes from all over the Spice Islands, developed during the times of Dutch colonization to allow colonists to sample dishes from all over Indonesia.

Tompouce

Orange tompouce Amsterdam Kars Alfrink

Image by: CC BY 2.0 Kars Alfrink via Flickr

Rectangular pastry with cream filling, served with a smooth layer of colored cream on top. You must try these colorful rectangular cakes covered with cream and pastry sugar among the puff pastry dough.

BONUS: Amsterdam’s Coffee Shops

The only country in the world where drugs are freely sold in a controlled manner is the Netherlands. One of the most popular places for tourists in Amsterdam is undoubtedly Amsterdam’s famous coffee shops (+18). Don’t let the name fool you here, apart from coffee, marijuana (called soft drug in English) and hashish are sold freely in gram packages! But beware, such products and drugs are strictly prohibited outside of these coffee shops! What are the menus in these cafes? Marijuana or hashish is available in gram packages or as ready-made cigarette holders under the name of a joint. Here you can buy lightly or hard, however you want. It is generally preferred as a rolled cigarette called joint, mixed with marijuana or hashish and tobacco. The addicts also drink pure (it will be harder). Joints (rolled cigarettes) start from €3, many prices and products are available, and the people in the cafe will help you according to your preference. If you are going to drink it for the first time, it is definitely not like smoking, it is recommended to drink slowly and for tea or juice. Also, ‘space cake’ could be an alternative for those who do not want to smoke joint. They put marijuana in it while the cake is being made, it gets high after eating it, but it’s not like a joint right away, it takes longer to get high to the digestive system! Do not carry these products on the street in the Netherlands as a gift or try to take them with you to another country, the use of these products in other European countries are strictly prohibited.

For Video https://youtu.be/eS72vygulL4

For our other articles about Amsterdam;

What to do in Amsterdam VondelPark, Vondelpark Rules, Freedoms

Sources:

Iamsterdam.com

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